During the First Day of Unleavened Bread this year, Harold Smith brought up an interesting analogy. He showed that Ancient Israel was continually complaining and murmuring about conditions that were different than what they had available to them in Eygpt.

They complained about the shortage of food and water, the quality of the food and the lack of specific quality food items available to them in Eygpt but not in the desert on their way to the”promised” land.

As a result of their constant badgering and complaining, they all died in the wilderness without ever attaining the promised land.

Could we be complaining about not having the things that are available in the world?

Many of us who have kept God’s laws for any length of time have become blessed financially in this world. The worlds good are more readily available to us now but is this closeness with the world’s goods causing us to be more comfortable with the things of the world and the way the world looks at things? Do we see “good” in the world now and are we attracted to that good?

Revelation says that one of the reasons for the lukewarm attitude of Laodicea is because they feel that they are rich and increased with goods.

Rev 3:16  So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth.
Rev 3:17  Because thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked:

Could this familiarness with the world’s wealth be instilling in us a less focused view of the;

  1. Lust of the Flesh
  2.         Lust of the eyes
  3.        The pride of Life

Do we see more value in the world than we used to? Are we quick to make excuses for the way the world sees things? Have we honestly come out of the world or are we stuck halfway in between? The love of the world is dangerous to a Christian and will cause harm.

Mar_4:19  And the cares of this world, and the deceitfulness of riches, and the lusts of other things entering in, choke the word, and it becometh unfruitful.

If we become too familiar or comfortable with the world, it causes us to be unable to see the evil in the world and the damage that it causes us, hence the blindness of Laodicea.

Rev 3:17  Because thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked:  

So let’s check ourselves, have we become complacent about the evils of the world? Do we find ourselves enjoying the productions of the world way too much considering the darkness embedded in almost every production put out for public consumption?

Definition: a feeling of smug or uncritical satisfaction with oneself or one’s achievements.

That complacency translates to a lack of zeal, the very condition which God finds so destructive for those of Laodicea. Getting rid of this complacent attitude is what He tells us we need to do to open the door for Christ.

Rev 3:19  As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten: be zealous therefore, and repent.
Rev 3:20  Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me. 

So take stock, brethren, perhaps you will be able to see more clearly what needs to be done as Christ approaches.

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