I found that the bible also mentions zeal as being part of the Armor of God. Surely the lack of Zeal is shown as a failing of the Laodicean Church ERA and one of the things that Christ ask each of us to put on. I ran across a bible study on the Armor of God at the United Church of God’s website. It covered the Cloak of Zeal very well so I wanted to present it to you here. – Editor

Lesson 9: The Cloak of Zeal

Another piece of armor, not described by Paul but mentioned in Isaiah, is the cloak of zeal. While not listed with the rest of the armor of God, this cloak factors heavily in the lives of Christians everywhere.

On July 16, 2009, one young man stepped ashore of Marina Del Rey to complete his 13-month-long journey around the world. At the conclusion of his trip, Zac Sunderland officially became the youngest person in the world to have circumnavigated the globe alone in a boat.

This amazing accomplishment began long before Zac set sail. His family was a sailing family and was fully supportive. They ensured Zac had all the latest safety equipment, from GPS to satellite phone to access to the best weather information. But ultimately it was Zac’s own zeal that propelled him through the months of preparation and 13-month sailing marathon.

Zac and his 36-foot boat, the Intrepid, endured an impressive list of hardships while out at sea, which, according to a Los Angeles Times article, included “trying to fix broken rigging in 15-foot seas and gale-force winds” and a close call “in the Indian Ocean [with] a mysterious-looking vessel that seemed sure to harbor pirates.”

Zac could have landed in a port and called it quits at any point during his voyage. And let’s face it; a potential scuffle with pirates would be enough to encourage most to throw in the towel and never set sail again. Yet Zac stuck with his goal and, as a result, gained the irrevocable title of the first person under 18 years old to sail around the world alone.

What kept him going? In his own words, “I think society puts young people in a box—people 15, 16, 17—and does not expect them to do much but go to high school and play football and stuff like that. This just shows they can do a lot more with some strong ambition and desire. My [advice] is to get out there and do your thing with all you got.”

In other words, it was zeal that carried Zac through. He decided on a goal, and his zeal to achieve it kept him going, even when things turned ugly.

 

Cloaked With Zeal

When cloaks appear in movies or books, it’s often in conjunction with mysterious and enigmatic characters, shrouded in airs of intrigue or danger. But beyond their appeal in works of fiction, the cloaks used by ancient armies had a variety of uses that make them relevant today, not as a point of fleeting interest, but as an invaluable tool in our constant war against Satan.

What purpose did the cloak serve in the Roman army?

Armor of God: The Cloak of Zeal

The cloak served multiple important functions for the Roman soldier. It provided warmth, which was important to defend against the cold. Natural oils were used to make it nearly waterproof, which was important when the rains came. It also provided makeshift bedding, which was important during long marches.

Without his cloak, a soldier was subject to bitter cold, freezing rain and painfully uncomfortable nights. These unfortunate conditions would give a noticeable edge to a better equipped enemy, since a cold, wet and sore soldier can easily be a demotivated soldier. And a demotivated soldier, while not incapable of fighting, will not be performing at his peak.

What is zeal?

Zechariah 8:2
Thus says the Lord of hosts: “I am zealous for Zion with great zeal; with great fervor I am zealous for her.”

God Himself is zealous and fervently passionate about His people and His plan. In simplest terms, zeal is fuel. It is anything that drives people: their passion, their purpose, what they live for. For Christians, zeal is a burning desire to do God’s will and to live according to His purpose.

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